…and there was a light, that never goes out, for he hath given us just that, to which all those forced into darkness can look to. Illuminating the shadows where Latinos are, Morrissey’s hymns becomes the voice of the alienated in this society. While the connection may derive from a range of reasons such as parallels to being an Irish in England or being Latino in the U.S to the musical style and themes which may resonantly be similar to that of the traditional Mexican music, “Rancheras“.                                                                                         

Virgen de Mozalupe

El Rey Javier Solis

Here we shall see a comparison of “Sombras” by Javier Solis, with “I know it’s over” by The Smiths, whom Morrissey was a singer for. Both of these songs share the somber theme,a dearth of love. Javier Solis sings that he had a love, a light that illuminated his life, but all he has now is a shadow, and he is dying inside.

Here I will provide a rough translation of the song by Solis

I would like to slowly drain my veins, all my blood I shall see at your feet.

So that I may show, that I cannot love anymore,

Then death is what comes after

However, your blue eyes,

 blue that the sky and sea possess,

are closed for me,

Without seeing you

 I am lost in my solitude

Only shadows caressing my hands

Only shadows in my tremulous voice

I could have been happy, I am dying while living,

Living in tears, the most horrific passages

Are given by this never ending drama

Only shadows between your life and mine

Only shadows between your love and mine

How brief your presence was in my weariness

How tepid your hands and voice was,

Your light arrived like a firefly

And it drove away the shadows in my corner.

Like a trembling Lilliputian I remained

Without the blue of your sea-like eyes

That are closed for me

Without seeing you, is how I am, lost in solitude.

Only shadows caressing my hands,

Only shadows in my tremulous voice

I could have been happy, and I am dying while alive,

And I am living in tears, the most horrific passages

Of this never ending drama.

Only shadows between your life and mine

Only shadows between your love and mine…

For this song, love never was an option to begin with, and so life is certainly over.  

The similarity in themes demonstrates how the music which is traditional to Mexicanos can be personified by Morrissey’s music thus resulting in the esteem by Latinos who may be immigrants and are reminded of home, or those who were born here and recall their parents playing such music.

 

Fiat lux   

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About ocbarrios

Professor for Cal State Fullerton's Barrio Studies class for Fall 2011 semester

One response »

  1. Don’t forget the verse-by-verse comparison between “There is a Light that Never Goes Out” and “Cama de Piedra” by Cuco Sánchez!

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